Security, Modularity Drive Navy Cyber

By: Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

“Cleaner, more modular software that can be updated with less fuss tops the U.S. Navy’s wish list as it girds its fleet for warfighting in cyberspace. These advances would not only help the service stay atop the wave of information system innovation but also contribute to better security amid growing and changing threats.

The Navy wants industry to develop operating systems and software from the start with fewer bugs. These software products should have fewer vulnerabilities that can be exploited by an adversary, which compound the service’s efforts at cybersecurity.

“We tend to continue to use code that has vulnerabilities over and over again in the commercial world, and industry can help drive the requirement to really clean up some of the code that’s already there,” offers Rear Adm. Nancy A. Norton, USN, director of warfare integration for information warfare in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OpNav) and deputy director of Navy cybersecurity.”

CLICK HERE to read more.

Cyber Maximizes Combat Power

By: George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

“Synchronizing cyber with other domains—air, land, sea and space—is still a challenge, but the situation is improving, Lt. Col. Mark Esslinger, USAF, U.S. Pacific Command Joint Cyber Center, asserted during the AFCEA TechNet Asia-Pacific conference November 15-17 in Honolulu.

Col. Esslinger served on a panel of cyber experts. Panelists agreed that the authorities to conduct cyber operations—along with policies, doctrines, tactics, techniques and procedures—still need to be defined. “The cyber mission force is still maturing, and the combatant commands are learning to integrate their capabilities,” Col. Esslinger offered.”

CLICK HERE to read more.

The Cyber Implications of Acquisition Speed: Part IV

By Nickolas Guertin and James P. Craft, SIGNAL Magazine

“One technique for speeding up the acquisition process is the use of open systems architecture. Employing open systems architecture (OSA) capabilities is the intelligent way to create next-generation solutions for warfighters in all services. OSA-based solutions can optimize scarce financial and engineering resources and enable the United States and its coalition partners to extend their strategic military advantages over global adversaries.

The U.S. Department of the Navy (DON) provides an example of OSA’s success. The DON initiated an open architecture policy in 2004. In 2010, the undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics started the Better Buying Power initiative and asked the Navy to lead the OSA effort. ”

CLICK HERE to read more.